Subscribe via: RSS

How to Stop Your Child From Cursing

Posted on 14 February 2013

When you hear your child cursing the first time, it is not music to your ears. Normal reaction to that would be anger or irritation to your child because something bad came out of his/her mouth. But as much as you can, don’t show your child that you are so upset because it might cause a negative effect on him/her and may lead to child behavior problems.

Follow Me on Pinterest

This is a fact: younger children in their toddler years do not know the meaning of those profane words. They may have heard it on TV or from someone at home. If your child is still so young to understand what a curse means, you can’t make him/her understand it by telling him/her about it. A child’s inquisitive nature and saying what he/she usually hears are normal behaviors that you should understand and be able to cope with.

If you think that there’s an adult or young teenager who cusses and says profane words around your child, you should first confront that person and tell him/her not to say bad words in front of the child. You need to discipline both your young one and the adult culprit because he/she plays a huge role in the cursing problem of your child. If it is on TV, radio or somewhere else that your child got the profane words, make sure to monitor what he/she listens and watches to prevent the cursing from happening again.

Examine your child’s behavior with such small changes and at the same time tell him/her that those words are bad and should not be mentioned by children. If your kid is stubborn and won’t listen, try not to get upset or angry because a child will do anything to catch a parent’s attention. By cursing, he/she is triggering you to react and attend to him/her. That behavior from him/her and that reaction from you will register to his/her mind as a good thing because if he/she does it again, you’ll attend to him/her again.

You can use discipline if your child is too stubborn and won’t listen. Giving him/her the time off from playing is one way to discipline your child without you saying any harsh words or doing drastic moves. Use a corner in your home where your child can sit down facing the wall. Make sure that this corner is vacant and without any toy or object that your child can play with. Tell your child that this time out is for him/her to behave well. It is not a punishment but a break from playing and from saying those bad words. Make him understand that time out means no play, and time out means he did something wrong.

Tackle this issue calmly and wisely because your child would fear you if you’ll use too much force or pressure. A child is a child and no negative treatment can make things better for you and your child.

Encouragement is also an important element in this cursing problem. When your child behaves properly or calms down after a time out, wait for your child to approach to you. If he/she says sorry, accept it and tell him/her that cursing is bad. You can incorporate rewards if your child can sustain a long period of time without cursing. It could be a deal between the two of you, or a game or a surprise.

Your child will always learn good things from you if you tackle each challenge as a positive learning experience for both of you. He/She is relying on you to show the right things and to say the right words. If there are other people that can influence your child, you need to talk to them in order for things to truly work out.

Harrison Fray is an experienced and expert home decor planner who specializes in kids bedding and kids room decor buying. His advice can help you to buy childrens bedding [http://www.kidstoddlerboutique.com] cheaply but with unique style. Harrison also gives great advice on Olive Kids boys bedding [http://www.kidstoddlerboutique.com/olive-kids-boys-bedding.html]. Drop by Kids Toddler Boutique and see what Harrison recommends.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2978123

This post was written by:

- who has written 1483 posts on Parenting Advice.

Arkin Archangel belongs to the family of MediaFreaks, an award-winning 3D animation studio and New Media company.

Contact the author

Leave a Reply